NEWS | Mr. Clean Algae Eraser ๐Ÿงผ

A Revolutionary New Pool Product Hits Shelves?

95 Thousand Reactions & 205 Thousand Shares

Mr. Clean Magic Eraser

shared with permission from Hibiscus Pools, Port St. Lucie Florida

On July 5th of 2018, Lisa Pack shared a photo to her Facebook page that exploded overnight, quickly going viral. A picture of a dirty Magic Eraser held above the crystalline blue water of her above-ground swimming pool. Mr. Clean Algae Eraser ๐Ÿงผ

Suddenly, the P&G product was floating in skimmer baskets everywhere, at least so it seemed across social media. However, it did not end there. Magazines and internet publications quickly scooped up the one-paragraph post like birds ๐Ÿฆ… of prey seizing rabbits ๐Ÿ‡ from a field. Tales of rapid green to cleans quickly ensued.

Mr. Clean Algae Eraser ๐Ÿงผ

At this point, a little more than a year has passed and all though the Magic Eraser post has lost a bit of traction, it has by no means fizzled. Enough is enough, all set to call bull ๐Ÿ’ฉ Bull ๐Ÿ’ฉ, I pulled the reins.

#TheNextMrClean

Being a fan of Mr. Clean, after all, who isn’t, evidenced by my failed attempt to be named as his 2016 replacement in the video above. That and wanting to do my due diligence, I did a quick search to locate Ms. Pack’s original story to refresh my memory.

Just when you thought you have heard it all, it turns out she never actually said that. WTF? ๐Ÿ˜ฑ

Was this just a game of Telephone โ˜Ž that went viral and like a Fish ๐Ÿก story grew larger and larger as it was passed (or shared) along? Funny thing, in reading her post pertaining to the ๐Ÿงผ Magic Eraser, Lisa Pack never once claims that the melamine foam cleaning product had remedied an algae ๐Ÿ‘พ problem. In fact, she states point-blank that her pool was NOT green ๐Ÿ’š. The only thing she said suggesting a water quality issue was that her pool “looked like it was getting cloudy.” ๐Ÿ‘€ This is the only thing she indicates the eraser cured. To me, having spent three decades in the pool industry, it sounds as though she was describing slightly hazy water.

 

110 Thousand Comments

Now, I did not read ๐Ÿ‘“ through the one hundred and ten thousand comments ๐Ÿ˜ฑ. I do not know if Lisa had replied to anyone with language implying the P&G sponge to be a weapon of algae destruction ๐Ÿ”ซ. It does, however, appear that the media may have put a wicked spin ๐ŸŒช on what she actually did say. To find out, I reached out to Lisa Pack, through Facebook of course, and this is what she had to say

Good morning!!ย ย  Yes my pool was hazy color, by no means was it green green.ย  I put the magic eraser in my skimmer basket over night and by the next morning it was clear as the sky.ย ย  I am a true believer of the magic erasers and I will continue to use them along with the chlorine – Lisa Pack

But, does the Magic Eraser Kill swimming pool algae?

What about the algicidal properties the internet publications say Pack boasted of? Friend, colleague and swimming pool myth-buster ๐Ÿ•ต Andrea Lynne Nannini, owner of Hibiscus Pools in Port St. Lucie Florida, has decided to put the internet publication’s puffery to the test. To see ๐Ÿ‘€ Nannini’s findings:ย The Pool and the Magic Eraser

 

Similar article: Lowering Total Alkalinity Without Affecting pH? ๐Ÿ›

๐Ÿ’ฅShare on Facebook, because Unsafe Swimming Pools SUCKโ€ผ
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